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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland found in the catalog.

rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland

Francis John Byrne

rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland

by Francis John Byrne

  • 145 Want to read
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Published by University of Ireland in Dublin .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Francis John Byrne.
The Physical Object
Pagination27p. ;
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18869840M

The heir-designate in early medieval Ireland, Gearóid Mac Niocaill, Irish Jurist 3 (), pp. – The rise of the Uí Néill and the high-kingship of Ireland, Francis John Byrne, O'Donnell Lecture, ; published Dublin, ; Irish regnal succession – a reappraisal, Donnchadh O Corrain, Studia Hibern , pp. 7– The history of Ireland – covers the period in the history of Ireland from the first Viking raids to the Norman first two centuries of this period are characterised by Viking raids and the subsequent Norse settlements along the coast. Viking ports were established at Dublin, Wexford, Waterford, Cork and Limerick, which became the first large towns in Ireland.

Sovereigns of Ireland (Ard Rí, or High Kings) From the pre-Christian to the Norman period. Source: Annals of the Four Masters.(up to AD) Notes: From the tribal abbreviations attached to each individual on the list it can be shown that the sovereignty of Ireland was monopolized by the dynasts of the Southern and Northern Ui Neill from the time of St. Patrick's arrival (circa ) to the.   Headline Book review: The Origins of the Irish. Geology comes first. Ireland’s location shaped who could people the island, where they came from and what they needed to bring with them.

Uí Néill (O’Neill) dynasty Source: The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages. An Irish macro-dynasty, which monopolized the so-called *high kingship during the earlier MA. Of the twelve ‘kings of Ireland. This book surveys Irish history in the first half of this millennium, written in a style which will make it accessible to those new to the subject, incorporating the findings of recent research, and offering a reinterpretation of the evidence.


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Rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland by Francis John Byrne Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rise of the Uí Néill and the high-kingship of Ireland. [Dublin, National University of Ireland, ?] (OCoLC) Named Person: Uı́ Néill (Family) Document Type: Book: All Authors /. The Rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland; The O'Donnell Lecture delivered at University College, Dublin on 28th November, ; Uí Néill on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland; The O'Donnell Lecture delivered at University College.

The Rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland. by Byrne, John Francis and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The annalists frequently describe later high kings as rígh Érenn co fressabra ("Kings of Ireland with Opposition"), which is a reference to the instability of the kingship of Tara from the death of Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill in Máel Sechnaill had been overthrown by Brian Boru inand restored in following Brian's death, but the example of Brian's coup was followed by First monarch: Sláine mac Dela.

The Rise of the Ui Neill and the high-kingship of Ireland. Byrne, Professor Francis John Byrne.: Published by Dublin: National University of Ireland (). The Northern Uí Néill would also alternate the High-Kingship of Ireland with their southern cousins the Southern Uí Néill into the 10th century.

Ireland's HIstory in Maps - the Northern Ui Neill; T.H. Mullin and J.E. Mullin (). "The Book of Ulster Surnames", The Black Staff Press This page was last edited on 16 June. Gaelic genealogies were important records used to validate claims to prestige and power and linked most ruling families in the northern part of Ireland, prior to the Elizabethan conquest, to the Uí Néill, who claimed high-kingship of Ireland from the 7th to the 11th century ad (Pender ).

The ultimate origin of this dynasty is attributed. The Eóganachta or Eoghanachta were an Irish dynasty centred on Cashel which dominated southern Ireland (namely the Kingdom of Munster) from the 6/7th to the 10th centuries, and following that, in a restricted form, the Kingdom of Desmond, and its offshoot Carbery, to the late 16th tradition the dynasty was founded by Conall Corc but named after his ancestor Éogan, the firstborn.

Niall Noígíallach or Niall of the Nine Hostages in English, was an Irish king believed to have lived during the 4th / 5th century. The Uí Néill dynasties, which dominated the northern part of Ireland between the 6th and 10th centuries, claim descent from him.

It is assumed that Niall was a real person, though much of the information preserved about him is legendary in nature, thus blurring. Yes, indeed there are. There are millions of direct descendants of Niall Noígíallach (believed to have ruled in the 4th or early 5th century) and of the 44 high kings from the Uí Néill dynasty that he founded, There are also probably hundreds of t.

The Eóganachta (English: Eugenians) or Eoghanachta were an Irish dynasty centred around Cashel which dominated southern Ireland from the 6/7th to the 10th centuries, [1] and following that, in a restricted form, the Kingdom of Desmond, and its offshoot Carbery, to the late 16th tradition the dynasty was founded by Conall Corc but named after his ancestor Éogan, the firstborn son.

It was one of the five early provinces of Ireland, and by A.D. it comprised much of the territory of the Southern Ui Neill with its capital at the royal site of Tara, Ireland's first captial. In Henry II bestowed Meath as an earldom to Hugh de Lacy, creating.

Brian Boru is the most famous Irish person before the modern era, whose death at the Battle of Clontarf in is one of the few events in the whole of Ireland’s medieval history to retain a place in the popular imagination.

Once, we were told that Brian, the great Christian king, gave his life in a battle on Good Friday against pagan Viking enemies whose defeat banished them from Ireland. Ireland, high kings of. Despite the popular perception of the importance of the ‘high kingship’ of Ireland, it is clear that early medieval Ireland did not possess a monarch whose rule was effective over the entire island, since the early law tracts (7th–8th cent.) specify only three grades of kingship, the most senior of which is a province king.

Uí Néill High KingsThe Uí Néill were descended from the protohistoric Niall Noígiallach, who may have been a real person; however, the way the genealogists and saga writers depict his ancestors and the relationships among his descendents is schematic and unhistorical.

Diarmait mac Cerbaill, his grandson (d. ), was an ancestor of the Southern Uí Néill, who were based in Meath and the. monopolized the Sacral High-Kingship of Tara, which for hundreds of years they alternated between their own two illustrious branches, the Nrorthern Ui Neill and the Southern Ui Neill.

The Northern Ui Neill divided into three great clans, the Cineal Eoghain. rise to a very important clan, later known as the Clann Aodha or MacKays (Mac Aodha.

Niall Noígíallach (Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈniːəl noɪˈɣiːələx], Old Irish "having nine hostages"), or in English, Niall of the Nine Hostages, was an Irish king, the ancestor of the Uí Néill dynasties that dominated the northern half of Ireland from the 6th to the 10th century.

Irish annalistic and chronicle sources place his reign in the late 4th and early 5th centuries. The High Kings of Ireland Ireland was traditionally divided into five fifths or provinces, ie., the Fifth of Munster, the Fifth of Leinster, the Fifth of Connacht, the Fifth of Ulster, and the Fifth of Meath.

Each of these fifths had an overking, and under them, numerous sub-kings and kingdoms. The Fifth of Ulster was controlled by the Northern Ui Neill, whose royal dynastic line included both. Ireland - Ireland - Early Celtic Ireland: Politically, Ireland was organized into a number of petty kingdoms, or clans (tuatha), each of which was quite independent under its elected king.

Groups of tuatha tended to combine, but the king who claimed overlordship in each group had a primacy of honour rather than of jurisdiction. Not until the 10th century ad was there a king of all Ireland. Eochu Mugmedón, the Ard Ri in the middle 4th century and great-great-great-great-grandson of Conn of the Hundred Battles, had fostered a continued line of Kings for Ireland.

From his sons sprang the powerful Ui Niall (Ui Neill), Ui Briuin and Ui Fiachra line of kings of Ireland, Ulster, Midhe and Connacht.

The Kingdom of Munster (Irish: Ríocht Mhumhain) was a kingdom of Gaelic Ireland which existed in the south-west of the island from at least the 1st century BC until According to traditional Irish history found in the Annals of the Four Masters, the kingdom originated as the territory of the Clanna Dedad (sometimes known as the Dáirine), an Érainn tribe of Irish Gaels.The Ui Ethach Coba (Ui Ethach Uladh in the baronies of Iveagh, in co.

Down) were a powerful group (of Dál n-Araidhe descent) in adjoining county Down, however the Book of Fenagh and Leabhar na gCeart make note of an Ui Echach (baronies of Iveagh, co.

Down) as a sub-territory of Airghialla.Other articles where O’Neill family is discussed: Ireland: The Shane O’Neill rebellion: these rebellions, that of Shane O’Neill, fully exposed the weakness and later the folly of the government. O’Neill’s father, Conn the Lame (Conn Bacach), who as the “O’Neill” was head of a whole network of clans, had been made earl of Tyrone inand the succession rights of his.